My Blog List

People I Know

Eclectic Folks

Media Blogs

Politics, Policy Blogs

Page Rank

Check Page Rank of your Web site pages instantly:

This page rank checking tool is powered by Page Rank Checker service

Friday, December 23, 2005


My friend Mark sent out this Christmas/Hanukkah merger e-mail thing, which Socks used on December 1. (Another piece on the holiday confusion is here.)

Subsequently, I read that the TV show The O.C., which I don't watch, has also suggested such a blending a couple years ago. The Yarmuclaus hat (above) is "sold out for the 2005 Chrismukkah season!" - and has been for some time.

So what to make of this blending, complete with Chrismukkah greeting cards?

It seems to tick off this person, who writes:
Chanukkah is probably one of the best known Jewish holidays, not because of any great religious significance, but because of its proximity to Christmas. Many non-Jews (and even many assimilated Jews!) think of this holiday as the Jewish Christmas, adopting many of the Christmas customs, such as elaborate gift-giving and decoration. It is bitterly ironic that this holiday, which has its roots in a revolution against assimilation and the suppression of Jewish religion, has become the most assimilated, secular holiday on our calendar.

Meanwhile, this also ties into what friend Daniel calls "the latest phony baloney distraction put out by the corporate media..."The War On Christmas." An interesting CNN debate can be found within this blog entry.

Now, Dorian, I'd like to agree with you on this one. Fact is, though, if you say it often enough, this "war" seems to become true for enough people. One of my relatives sent me one of those "Say 'Merry Christmas' proudly" e-mails, with instructions to not let "them take it away from us." The exact wording I don't have because I deleted it. Quickly.

My favorite Lutheran pastor notes that it isn't even Christmastime yet.

I must admit that the whole controversy surprised me a bit. I thought we had it all worked out: you have the creche, but the menorrah must be within 10 feet, and also some Kwanzaa colors, with the Christm.., holida.., the coniferous tree nearby.
Lots of people (I'd like to say most people, but...) know that there was no proof that Jesus was born on December 25, but it was a date picked by the church to co-opt those solstice parties. I've long theorized that Jesus was not a Capricorn but a Pisces. (What do YOU think?)

So Chrismukkah- place for the "merry mish-mash" of cultural diversity or an attack on both Judaism and Christianity? I think the term's a bit silly, but as a Christian, I'm not threatened by it, or for that matter, by saying "Season's Greetings." In other words, I support W's choice of Christmas cards. It was inevitable that I agree with him on something EVENTUALLY.

No comments: