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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

The Politics of Sex, Drugs, and El Kabong

The U.S. Census Bureau reports that the nation's population will reach the historic milestone of 300 million on Oct. 17 at about 7:46 a.m. (EDT). This comes almost 39 years after the 200 million mark was reached on Nov. 20, 1967. The estimate is based on the expectation that the United States will register one birth every seven seconds and one death every 13 seconds between now and Oct. 17, while net international migration is expected to add one person every 31 seconds. The result is an increase in the total population of one person every 11 seconds.
As of this writing, 299,999,211 in the US and 6,550,942,258 in the world.
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Felicity Huffman, Marg Helgenberger, Angie Harmon, Rosario Dawson, Tyne Daly, Regina King, Lauren Graham, Daphne Zuniga and Votar appear in a series of PSAs for Women's Voices. Women Vote. Many of them are talking about "their first time." And based on Helgenberger's extended video on ABC News This Week "Sex Appeal and the Women's Vote," the double entrende is intentional. "There are 20 million women who did not vote in 2004, and when they take part in the next election, they can change history." Of course, if they need to register, it's too late in New York State for the November 7 election.
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To honest, I never knew the name Ed Benedict, who died late last month, but his creations as primary character designer at Hanna-Barbera, including the various characters on The Flintstones, Yogi Bear, Quick Draw McGraw, and especially Huckleberry Hound, brought me hours of pleasure in my childhood. First time I ever heard the song "Clementine" was from Huck. When I had an uncontrollable nosebleed when I was 5 1/2 and ended up in the hospital, it was Huck, Yogi, and Quick Draw (and his alter ego, El Kabong) that got me through the fear and the boredom. El Kabong was the masked character that would smash a perfectly good guitar, long before Pete Townsend, over the heads of the bad guys. When you're 5 1/2, this is very funny.

An appreciation of Ed Benedict
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Stop the Drug War.org has "added The Speakeasy, a new blog featuring our staff of seasoned drug policy experts, the editor of our Drug War Chronicle (the worldÂ’s leading drug policy newsletter), the best comments from our 40,000 person strong network of supporters, and upcoming special guest bloggers (celebrities, well-known policy wonks, and other famous personalities)."
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It's stewardship time atmyy church. One of the questions we've been asked is how many people will each of us tell about our First Presbyterian Church Albany website. I said 100. Done. AND I've added it to my weblog, along with our former intern Ben Ropp's Image Remora.
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Underground Railroad History Project events:

October 21 - National Abolition Hall of Fame Inductee Commemoration and Annual Dinner - for information visit www.abolitionhof.org

October 29 - UGR Trolley tour - 1-3pm - led by Paul and Mary Liz Stewart of URHPCR - for tickets call 518-452-1675 or visit www.knowledgenetwork.org
Of special note: November 12 - Bossambajazz at the Van Dyck - 4-8pm - annual URHPCR fundraiser - From the first note, to the last beat, Bossambajazz promises to take you on a magical musical tour. Support URHPCR and enjoy an evening of great jazz and pleasant company at the historic Van Dyck Restaurant in Schenectady. Tickets available through http://www.ugrworkshop.com/ or call 518-436-0562 or 518-432-4432.

1 comment:

claire said...

I first heard of the Underground Railroad through a book I bought, a biography of Harriet Tubman, in the 6th grade through Scholastic Book Services. Are they still around? I got some wonderful books through them.

The book--I think the title was just "The Underground Railroad"--was an inspiration to me. You gotta understand, I was a white girl on Long Island going to an all-white Catholic school and living in an all-white neighborhood. This book was one of my first introductions to injustice of any kind. The book showed me that even if I did not personally suffer injustice, that it was my responsibility to do all I could to fight injustice to others. I wish some other Irish Catholics from Long Island (oh, like, Bill O'Reilly or Sean Hannity) had gotten the same message.