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Sunday, September 30, 2007

Roger Answers Your Questions, Scott and Gordini

The blogger Scott, husband of Marcia and father of Nigel, one of those people who still cares about the NHL, was kind enough to ask:

1. What do you think are the chances of us seeing another "Subway Series" this October?

You must have me mistaken with someone who has any idea. I had the St. Louis Cardinals losing every round they played (and won) last year.

That said, highly unlikely. In fact, much to my surprise, I think the Yankees have a better chance of getting there than the Mets, much to my disappointment. I’m rooting for the wild card to come out of the NL West (and for the Mets to win their division) because I think THEY think they can’t beat the Phillies in a second round matchup, whereas the Yankees could beat Boston, if they get past the first round. Though the Yanks have had a difficult time with the Angels this season, so if the Angels beat the Red Sox, the Yankees may be in trouble. Incidentally, yesterday was the centennial of the birth of original Angels' owner, Gene Autry.

(When you asked a few days ago, the Mets were up by 2 games. Now they're tied with a game to go, with no guarantee that they'll even get IN the playoffs.)

2. What do you consider your favorite TV Drama of all-time?

Quite possibly St. Elsewhere, although Hill Street Blues and Homicide are up there. My favorite show as a kid, though was the Defenders, a lawyer show with E.G. Marshall and a pre-Brady Bunch Robert Reed. I was also fond of East Side/West Side with George C. Scott. There was an anthology show called The Bold Ones, and The Senator segment with Hal Holbrook was great, got Emmy love, but it lasted but a season. Was Twilight Zone a drama? That gets its own special mention.

3. What do you consider your favorite TV sit-com of all-time?

The Dick van Dyke Show. The perfect balance of home life and work life. Great physical comedy by DVD. MTM's capri pants. And Richard Deacon from Binghamton, NY. Lasted five years - not too short, not long enough to wear out its welcome, which I'm afraid M*A*S*H, arguably a better show in its prime, did for me.

Though I must give some consideration to the Mary Tyler Moore Show, with a magnificent evolving cast, also did home and work well, as did, now that I think of it, the Bob Newhart Show, the one where he plays the shrink.

A comedy that evolved into a good show was Barney Miller, which scrapped any real pretense of a home life after the first season (Barbara Barrie played Barney's wife), and found its voice.

4. What scares you the most about Lydia growing up?

I suppose I'm dreading that inevitable teenage period when she thinks I'm an irrelevant, archaic druid. But I have to say that the great thing about having no idea what you're doing as a parent - in that most of my preconceived notions about fatherhood could be tossed into the Dumpster - is that I don't think too much about her Growing Up; I'm trying to take care of her Now.

I am reminded, again, about racism and racialism. I had never heard the latter term until I watched some Nelson Mandela speech right after he was released from prison. Some people use the terms interchangeably, but I feel a distinction. To me, racism is blatant inequity under the law or in society; e.g., the Jena 6 charged more harshly for their crimes than the white students who had assaulted black kids. Whereas, racialism is more the "damn fool" things people say and do, such as Bill O'Reilly.
I just started reading Anti-Racist Parent. By "just", I mean yesterday; interesting stuff.

Back to TV: Lydia decided just this week that she wanted to put on her right sock, then her right shoe, left sock and left shoe. This reminded me of a conversation that Mike Stivic had with Archie Bunker (a sock, sock, shoe, shoe guy) on All in the Family; that was a good show, too.
***
Meanwhile, blogger Gordon, newly re-minted Chicagoan, podcaster, and most importantly, March Piscean, writes: "OK, well, here's a question that I think you can answer: do you ever have a moment where you think 'I'm so full of hot gas?'"

Immediately, I started writing this rambling epic indicating how there are several areas where I have no opinions at all, that the opinions I do have are often based on reason and experience, and that I don't love the sound of my own voice as much as many do. I noted how, in keeping with a conversation he and I had privately, that I read other viewpoints; in fact, I spent some time this week listening to some of the speeches on the White Nationalist News Network, which I found by clicking Next Blog.

I addressed how an old girlfriend accused me of Male Answer Syndrome, which I rejected, not because it wasn't possibly true, but because the thing I was answering (about alpacas being more pleasant than llamas) I actually DID know from research in my job. (And not so incidentally, claims that I have MAS has dropped SIGNIFICANTLY since I appeared on that game show. And there was other stuff about my good listening and observing skills.

But, sure, OK, don't we all feel like we're fakin' it sometimes? Don't at least many of us feel as though we're about 11 and are pretending to wear grown-up clothes periodically?

So, Gordon, I could have just said "Yes." But somehow, I thought you wanted a little more than that.
***
Oh, and another one of my favorite reads, Tom the Dog, who has been on one more game show than I have, says nice things about me. Right back at you.


ROG

4 comments:

Roger Green said...

From MLB.com:
And if you’re wondering why the Phillies don’t just get the division title based on their season-series victory over the Mets, it’s because head-to-head tie-breakers are used only when both teams already have a playoff spot secured, and they simply determine seeding. Any regular-season tie that would send the loser home for the year has to be broken on the field.

Oh, and the Mets h=gave up SEVEN runs in the first inning; I'm not watching.

Roger Green said...

Oy.

Note to Fred Hembeck:
After Buckner retired from professional baseball he moved his family to Boise, Idaho, where he invested in real estate: one of the housing subdivisions which he developed is named Fenway Park. He also owns Bill Buckner Motors in Emmett, Idaho.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Buckner

Scott said...

As someone who has become a Phillies fan since moving to Pennsylvania, I was glad to see them make it. I am sorry to see that the Mets, the team you seem to root for, didn't make it. But it was a great finish this year, no matter who made it to the playoffs.

I am going to have to rent the Dick Van Dyke show on DVD. I have heard much good about it, but have never really watched it.

I was a sucker for "LA Law" and then "ER" (which replaced it's slot).

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