My Blog List

People I Know

Eclectic Folks

Media Blogs

Politics, Policy Blogs

Page Rank

Check Page Rank of your Web site pages instantly:

This page rank checking tool is powered by Page Rank Checker service

Monday, June 23, 2008

Carlin and other family-friendly topics



So I wake up at four a.m. for the third time in the night, because I still can't find a comfortable sleeping position, probably because I didn't take my pain pills all day yesterday, because I didn't want to become habituated to them, so I get up and check Evanier, who notes George Carlin has died, and he writes: "Seven words come immediately to mind. All are appropriate for the occasion." And I check my blog and note that I'd only mentioned Carlin thrice, twice on baseball and football, and once on education, but I recall how I'd been watching Carlin for decades, from the "hippy, dippy weatherman I remember him doing on the "Ed Sullivan Show" to one of the sharpest minds of social commentary, and there's a pain in my heart AND my side. DAMN! (Not one of the seven words.)
***
Since one Kelly Brown specifically requested me to take this test, what could I do?

75

As a 1930s husband, I am
Superior

Take the test!



And speaking of family things, something I saw on the bus last week: Woman and daughter waiting for the bus, get on the bus. Woman sees child's father on the bus, apparently to the surprise of all concerned. She says to child, "Oh, your father's on the bus,' hands the child to the father, saying "YOU take her!!" then gets off the bus. Child cries for mommy a couple blocks, but is eventually soothed by daddy; Arthur would have been pleased.

At least that a better bus story than my wife experienced, which involved a three-year old running on the bus, failing, crying, and the mother screaming at the wailing child, "I told you not to run on the bus."
***
I was watching Bill Moyers again, and I must recommend it. It deals with race in America. One segment is about Slavery by Another Name, Douglas A. Blackmon's book about what the subtitle calls "the Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II."
Under laws enacted specifically to intimidate blacks, tens of thousands of African Americans were arbitrarily arrested, hit with outrageous fines, and charged for the costs of their own arrests. With no means to pay these ostensible "debts," prisoners were sold as forced laborers to coal mines, lumber camps, brickyards, railroads, quarries and farm plantations. Thousands of other African Americans were simply seized by southern landowners and compelled into years of involuntary servitude.
Blackmon has a website addressing the issue.

Moyers also previewed the documentary which opens the 21st season of P.O.V. TRACES OF THE TRADE: A STORY OF THE DEEP NORTH, which tells the story journey of discovery into the history and consequences of slavery and which will air on my PBS station Tuesday night.
***
Someone tipped me about Twilight Zone radio plays produced in 2004 for CBS radio using Rod Serling's original scripts, with Stacey Keach narrating and hosting.

ROG

2 comments:

GayProf said...

Take the pills! My gosh, are you crazy?

Roger Green said...

Also from Gordon: "Saturday night's Science Fiction Hall of Fame induction ceremony honored this Betty and Ian Ballantine (Literature Category), William Gibson (Literature Category), Richard M. Powers (Art Category), and ROD SERLING (Film, Television and Media Category.)" http://www.boingboing.net/2008/06/23/william-gibson-balla.html