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Sunday, June 08, 2008

A gay pride march

Back on March 9 of this year, there was this story in the Times Union by Jennifer Gish titled "Humanity in 'Laramie': High school actors project offers lesson on more than gay tolerance". It was about Bill Ziskin, a teacher at Schenectady High, directing his young actors in Moises Kaufman's "The Laramie Project." Gish writes: The play is based on interviews conducted by New York theater students with the townspeople of Laramie, Wyo., after the 1998 ultimately fatal beating of gay college student Matthew Shepard. Because of its mature nature and strong language, Ziskin did
run the idea by school administrators before going ahead with it... Today, it's hard for some of the kids to imagine that kind of brutality.
One of the actors was quoted as saying, "When they told us about it I thought it was something that happened a while ago, like the '70s or the '80s."

Ah, the optimism of youth. Earlier this year, though the stories I read were about a month after the fact, a Gay California student’s slaying sparks outcry, and "Activists demand that middle schools do more to teach tolerance." Lawrence King -- Student Who Was Murdered For Being Gay -- To Be Honored With National Day Of Silence. I heard there was a similar case in Florida recently like the California case cited.

As for that day of silence, in some places such Mount Si High School in Snoqualmie, WA, it was anything but, as I read this Seattle Times account Lynn Thompson. Unfortunately, I actually sort of know one of the people protesting against gay acceptance.

As New Yorkers almost surely know, the governor of the state has ordered government agencies to recognize gay marriages that were performed in states and countries where they are legal. While, for at least one of my gay blogging colleagues, marriage is not such an overriding issue, for others ,it is of paramount importance.

I note all of this as my church plans once again to participate in the gay pride parade next Sunday. that same gay blogger I know opined that the idea of a march might have been diluted by corporate interests. I think we agreed that MAYBE in locations with a large gay population, such as New York City and San Francisco, it has lost its urgency. I'm convinced, however, that it still has meaning and efficacy in places like Albany, NY.



ROG

1 comment:

Deborah said...

I think that unfortunately there is still a need for these parades to happen, and a need even in places like New York and San Francisco. Here in France, I can tell you the shock and surprise I had on seeing two young men kiss the other day. Mind, this was not shock and surprise because I think these things shouldn't happen; it is simply that these things usually don't happen, because the cost in castigation is too high. The two American churches in Paris recuperate more and more gays wishing to worship openly at the side of the person they love, because in France they can't even openly hold their lover's hand without social banishment...

Deborah