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Monday, September 28, 2009

Roger Answers Your Question, Scott

Our next contestant is Scott, husband of Marcia (no, not my sister), father of Nigel and, since September 22 of Ian:

Who's going to win the NL pennant, the AL pennant, and eventually the World Series?

I thought in the beginning of the season the Red Sox would be the AL wild card but would get to the Series. Not feeling it any more. While the Angels COULD beat them, I got to think that the Yankees just seem too solid to lose.

Did you happen to read that cover story about Detroit in Sports Illustrated this week? I REALLY will be rooting for the Tigers, but I'm not seeing it happening. If it did, I'd be happy - shades of 1968. (Off topic: BREAK UP THE LIONS!)

I don't see the NL wild card (probably Colorado, though I'd prefer the Giants) winning the pennant. The Phillies have an unreliable closer and leave too many on base. Certainly can make the case for the Dodgers, but I'll go with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Want to say Cards win the Series - shades of 1964 - but I think the Yankees, shut out of the postseason last year, are ticked off enough to win it all - shades of 1928 and 1943.

Is there an entertainer (singer, musician, actor, all, etc.) that you first couldn't understand why they were even in the business, but now admire their work?

Yeah. Almost any singer-songwriter whose singing voice isn't pretty; the first is Bob Dylan, who I first knew as a singer, long before I heard that he wrote all of those songs that other people performed. Then I thought that he should ONLY be a songwriter. But given the number of Dylan albums in my collection, evidently I've changed my mind.

To a lesser degree, Neil Young: his voice wasn't as harsh as Dylan's so I did not have as far to travel to get to owning well over a dozen Neil albums, just as I own numerous Dylan discs.

Given how the media has access to so much information and gets to see so much of a famous person's life, do you think it's best to always steer clear of them being accepted as role models?

I think young actors and athletes and musicians are ill-served. If there was some sort of mechanism that said that when you reach a certain level of the profession you seek, you need some sort of counseling to make sure your head is on straight. I'm thinking of folks like the Mets' Doc Gooden and Darryl Strawberry, who had too much money too quickly and screwed themselves up.

But everybody is a role model for someone. One can refuse to accept it - was it Charles Barkley who said that he wasn't role model for anyone? - but it doesn't alter the fact that he is. I'm a role model, you're a role model, even if we're unaware. And you don't even know when one's going to become a role model. The Phillies fan who catches a foul ball, hands the ball to his daughter who throws it back, then hugs his daughter; he's a role model. Now if he chewed out his daughter instead, he'd STILL be a role model, albeit not a very good one.

On the other side of this, who that is famous do you think is a good example of a good role model?

There are lots of athletes and performers who work for their various charities, sometimes with limited publicity nationally. That said, I've always been impressed with Bill Russell (Boston Celtics) and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Milwaukee Bucks, LA Lakers) for the way they carry themselves. Kareem is also a JEOPARDY! winner - actually the week before I won - so that's also a plus. BTW, he's going to be on JEOPARDY! this season in a million-dollar celebrity invitational; someone's favorite charity will receive one million dollars at the end of the season.

What is your favorite show that is not shown on one of the big four networks (and Jeopardy!, though syndicated, counts as a big network show, since it's always found on one of their local affiliates)?

Scott, with that caveat, you know me too well. Actually, don't mind watching some of the daughter's shows such as Jack's Big Music Show (Noggin). But I suppose I'll pick The Closer on TNT; once you realize it's not a whodunit, but rather how the team discerns it, it's much more interesting. There were a couple particularly moving episodes this summer.

That said, there are SO many shows out there that I might be interested in watching, I pretty much say "no" more often than "yes" lately. Even in this new season, I've taped only three new network shows (Glee; The Good Wife - strong cast; and Modern Family) and I haven't watched ANY of them yet. My wife started watching Glee with Lydia - she mistakenly thought it was child-friendly.

You might have posted this already and I missed it, but had Lydia been a boy, what were your choices for a name?

Had to ask the wife. She claims we agreed on Micah, but I'm not convinced. Sounds too much like the ever-popular Michael. In all likelihood, the child would still be called Male Child Green.



Roger Owen Green said...

It's Yom Kippur, which always reminds me of Sandy Koufax refusing to start Game 1 of the 1965 World Series because it was Yom Kippur. I was a 12-yr-old then 1965 and I remember having mixed feelings about this.
On one hand, I thought this was a tremendous act of faith, though I was Christan, not Jewish.
On the other hand, I was very happy, because I HATED the Dodgers, who had swept my beloved Yankees in the '63 WS.

Oh and the punchline is that Don Drysdale pitches GAME 1, loses badly. Koufax pitches Game 2, LOSES, and the Dodgers STILL beat the Minnesota Twins, 4 games to 3, when Drysdale wins his next start (Game 4), and Koufax wins Games 5 AND 7. Talk about short rest.

Scott said...

Thanks for the answers.

I agree with your assessments of the pennants.

And who would have thought the Dodgers would go on to beat the Twins in '65!?