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Tuesday, September 29, 2009

September Ramblin'

I wrote recently about music that made me cry, and I left an important piece out.

When I first joined the Trinity UMC choir in the January 1983, the lead soprano was named Arlene Mahigian. She had an amazingly lovely voice, but more than that, she took a liking to me. Though I was almost 30, she, who had a couple grown sons, decided to become my "choir mom". Among other things, she'd take my robe home when it needed cleaning.

In the winter of 1984-85, she developed cancer. In March 1985, the choir performed the Mozart requiem. Arlene was unable to sing, but she was there in a wheelchair, not only to support the choir, but also her son Peter and her husband Leo as they performed the Adagio by Albinoni (or more likely, Giazotto.) About three weeks later, I visited Arlene in the hospital, her beautiful hair having all fallen out. She looked wan and pale and I don't even think she opened her eyes. I didn't know she even knew I was there until she squeezed my fingers; then I knew. She died the next day, and the Adagio reminds me of her.

I hadn't heard it in quite a long time until it was on public radio one morning in the past 10 days. I heard it, and about 2/3s of the way through, I just wept. Here are three versions; none are as plainspoken as Leo and Peter playing, which I can still hear in my mind's ear.
Version 1
Version 2
Version 3
***
William Safire died, and I'm a bit sad. It's not that I liked his politics; often, in fact, I loathed them. Nut he at least had some intellect to his position. The current crop of the right-wing, Glenn Beck, et al, are better inciting the crowd, but Safire had miles more candlepower.

But I once appeared in his On Language column. I can't believe it was so long ago: December 19, 1982. In a piece called Vox of Pop Sixpack, He talked about "Who speaks for the average man? Out of whose mouth comes the voice of the people? A bit of doggerel in the Presidential campaign of 1920, sung by the supporters of James Cox and Franklin Roosevelt, used the Latin term vox populi, for ''voice of the people'': ''Cox or Harding, Harding or Cox?/ You tell us, populi, you got the vox.'' At that time, the chorus of voices that intoned ''Harding and Coolidge'' went under the name of John Citizen for highbrows, Joe Zilch for lowbrows..." Then he cites my suggestion of Joe Sixpack.

I also wrote to him about my suggestion of the term lunaversary to note the marking of the celebration of a month; e.g., if you were married for a month, you might celebrate your first lunaversary. Far more accurate than "one-month anniversary", anni- referring to year, and far shorter to boot. Safire did not use it in his column, but he did type me a response suggesting that the idea had merit; I still have that blue postcard somewhere in the attic.
***
I find myself agreeing with Mark Evanier over the fate of Roman Polanski. The VICTIM has suffered enough; would it be "justice" if she were forced to testify at a media frenzy of a trial? I find her position paramount. She said six and a half years ago, when Polanski was up for an Oscar: "And, honestly, the publicity surrounding it was so traumatic that what he did to me seemed to pale in comparison."
***
Nova: Darwin's Darkest Hour - Tues., October 6 at 8 p.m. (but check your local listings)

This two-hour scripted drama presents the remarkable story behind the birth of Darwin's radically controversial theory of evolution and reveals his deeply personal crisis of whether to publish his earthshaking ideas or to keep quiet to avoid potential backlash from the church.
***
How to make a grilled cheese sandwich
***
What happens when the world's most popular comic book company is assimilated by the Mouse Factory


ROG

1 comment:

Alan David Doane said...

Gonna have to disagree with the grilled-cheese sandwich guy; most of his tips are good (and well known, I think?), but covering the sandwich while it cooks results in the cheese leaking out of the sandwich onto the pan, and onyo onto the plate, as is clearly visible at the end of the video. I strongly feel the cheese belongs IN the sandwich. Going uncovered allows the cheese to melt without it being a messy disaster.

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to opine on this critical issue.