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Saturday, June 23, 2007

The Great 28

Twenty-eight years ago today, Lynn Moss made an honest man out of Fred Hembeck, a story he's written about here (June 23), here (June 23), here, and ESPECIALLY here. Kudos to you both. Go to Fred's MySpace blog and send them your best wishes.
***
And speaking of Mr. Hembeck, he e-mailed to remind me that Paul, Ringo, Yoko and Olivia are set to appear on Larry King's CNN show June 26 (9 pm Eastern, 8pm Central) to discuss the first anniversary of Cirque de Soleil's Fab-inspired "Love" show. Incidentally, my wife went to the Cirque de Soleil show "Delirium" this week in Albany with a friend of hers, while I stayed home with Lydia. She said it was very good, but that she needed to watch some more MTV or something, because of all the frenetic movement.
***
The other music-related thing I'll be taping this week is "Paul Simon: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song". On my local PBS station, it airs Wednesday at 9 pm, and features a bunch of folks singing the songs of Simon. It was taped last month.
***
I've never golfed in my life, yet I was intrigued by last weekend's piece in the Wall Street Journal, The Problem With 'Par'; If players at this weekend's U.S. Open can't hit the target score, who can? by John Paul Newport (June 16, 2007). Specifically, this paragraph:
"The notion of par has always been somewhat mushy, and is further confused by the word's other English-language usages. In most PGA Tour events, for instance, subpar scores are par for the course. Unless, of course, a pro is feeling physically subpar, in which case he might shoot above par. On the other hand, only amateurs with decidedly above-par skills can ever hope to post subpar scores."
***
If I lived in the Los Angeles area, I think I would apply for this job out of sheer curiosity:

The following position is available at E! Networks:
Job Title: Researcher
Organization: Research
City: Los Angeles
State: CA
Full-time position with benefits providing research, public records and ready reference.

Description: Provide entertainment research in support of all Comcast Entertainment Group units (E!, Style, G4, E! Online, International) including the following:
* Supply in-depth story and background research to assist writers and production staff.
* Locate court documents for legal backup.
* Access public records to locate individuals and track assets.
* Review copyright and trademark records to establish ownership and locate rights holders.
* Answer “ready reference” questions.
* Vet scripts for accuracy and perform fact checking.
* Help maintain both conventional and digital archives and databases.
Skills: College degree required; experience working in a library, archive or research setting; excellent organizational skills; extensive understanding of online databases, particularly Lexis/Nexis; excellent writing, spelling and grammatical skills; ability to work well under pressure; interest or experience working in the entertainment field a plus.
E! Networks is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

Contact Gina Handsberry at E! Entertainment. Please direct all inquiries to her at ghandsberry@eentertainment.com. She writes, on a listserv I access:
"This is not a media research position (i.e., we do not analyze Nielsen data). Rather, it is a show research position (we provide content research for the programs on the network) and would be well suited for a librarian, information professional, or anyone who has experience doing research for journalistic endeavors. It's not an easy position to fill, so I thought a post here couldn't hurt!"
ROG

1 comment:

Scott said...

Some what to defend the pro golfers that play above par at the US Open, they have a tendency to use REALLY tough courses, then rotated them every 10-15 years. I also think (I remember being told this and not sure if it was true) they cut the rough higher for the US Open then they would normally for any other tournament or just regular play.

But regardless, it is interesting to watch the pro players struggle at the US Open like typical weekend warrior golfers do all the time.