My Blog List

People I Know

Eclectic Folks

Media Blogs

Politics, Policy Blogs

Page Rank

Check Page Rank of your Web site pages instantly:

This page rank checking tool is powered by Page Rank Checker service

Sunday, June 24, 2007

Roger Answers Your Questions, Eddie and Nik

Nik is a relative stranger in a strange, kiwi-infested land.

Who is your favorite historical figure?
Oh, I have no idea; it changes all the time. Right now, I'm rather keen on Thurgood Marshall, who was counsel for the NAACP in the Brown vs. Board of Education case before he ended up on the Supreme Court.

What one country have you always wanted to visit?
There are so many. I'll pick Japan because it intrigues me the most.

What's your favorite kind of candy bar?
Mounds. Mmmm, coconut.

Do you like my new haircut?
You've never looked better.

I tend to give Eddie a difficult time for the sometimes large chunks of time between posts, yet he asks me questions anyway:

Aside from Paula Abdul, what other dark musical secrets does your collection hide? Milli Vanilli? David Lee Roth? Ratt? Hanson? Mariah Carey?
I don't really know what constitutes "dark musical secrets". Of the ones listed: no; one with Van Halen; no; 1 song on a compilation disc; yes-a greatest hits CD.

Has Lydia picked up any habits at school that you and Carol don't approve of? How do you handle it?
Not really. We're trying to make sure she's being assertive enough. There was a brief time a while ago when a boy in her class was trying to bully her, and she was too acquiescent, but that seems to have passed. She does say, "Eeew, gross!", which I figure she got from another student.

What are you reading right now? (That's my favorite question to ask people.)
Shrub by the late Molly Ivins.

And speaking of Bush, let me pose a question to you all. In Salon magazine Glenn Greenwald, in an excerpt of his new book, "A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency," says: "One of the principal dangers of vesting power in a leader who is convinced of his own righteousness -- who believes that, by virtue of his ascension to political power, he has been called to a crusade against Evil -- is that the moral imperative driving the mission will justify any and all means used to achieve it." So the question is: Has the President been corrupted to do evil while trying to good, or as a friend posits:
"Call me cynical, or whatever, but I don't believe for one nanosecond that Bush and his handlers believe in good and/or evil. They want power and control and empire. The only good they believe in is what's good for them. As far as I can see, they have achieved the degree of power that they have because so few people recognize just how base are their motives."
I actually know one of the 26% or 28% who support GWB, and it's because he's "a Christian man." I swear to Rudy. So, since he's "a Christian man," the things he does, from the war to stem cell restrictions, are "Christian" position. If you've read this blog before, you know: 1) I'm a Christian, and 2) this logic REALLY hurts my head.

1 comment:

Nik said...

I always like to believe people aren't fundamentally bad, but I have a lot of trouble trying to understand Bush's worldview and how he can reconcile it with Christianity's goals. I'd have to go with the former one - that he's been corrupted while trying to do good; but I also think a lust for power, propogating their moral worldview, whatever you want to call it, plays a substantial part too. Either way it's hard to imagine the Bush II presidency being seen as anything but a kind of tragedy.