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Saturday, October 17, 2009

Talking withing Songs QUESTIONS

I was just listening to a Best of Sam and Dave album. In the intro to I Thank You, someone says:
I want everybody to get up off your seat
And get your arms together, and your hands together
And give me some of that o-o-old soul clapping

with the last three words practically sung.

An even better intro, though not a better song, is on their You Don't Know What You Mean to Me, which has an almost preached "Eddie FLOYD wrote the song."

Going back to the earliest days of rock and roll, there have been spoken lyrics within the context of a song. Some work for me, such as the corny Leader of the Pack by THE SHANGRI-LAS:
Is she really going out with him?
Well, there she is. Let's ask her.
Betty, is that Jimmy's ring you're wearing?
Gee, it must be great riding with him
Is he picking you up after school today?
By the way, where'd you meet him?

Others, not so much. There is a truly awful interlude in an Everly Brothers song called Ebony Eyes:
The plane was way overdue so I went inside to the airlines desk and I said "Sir, I
wonder why 1203 is so late?" He said "Aww, they probably took off late or they
may have run into some turbulent weather and had to alter their course." I went
back outside and I waited at the gate and I watched the beacon light from the
control tower as it whipped through the dark ebony skies as if it were searching for
(my ebony eyes.) And then came the announcement over the loudspeaker-
"Would those having relatives or friends on flight number 1203 please report to the
chapel across the street at once."

The original Supremes did it in Love Is Here And Now You're Gone
You close the door to your heart
And you turned the key, locked your love away from me

You stripped me of my dreams
You gave me faith, then took my hope
Look at me now

My heart cries out for your touch
But you're not there
And the lonely cry fades in the air

It's OK, but not my favorite song from the group.

In fact, the LONGEST rap in the pre-rap era that I own has to be the album version of Stevie Wonder's Livin' For the City, all that about "New York City: just like I pictured it; skyscrapers and everything."

So, excluding rap, or songs with rap elements, such as Blondie's Rapture, how do you feel about songs with spoken lyrics. What songs do you like? What songs do you hate? You may also pick rap/hip hop songs as well, though I may (if we're talking early rap) or probably won't recognize the reference.


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